Wednesday, April 19, 2017

"it is with a heavy heart" [FINA] 


"The Final Problem" is a shocking tale, both for contemporaries of the Strand Magazine as well as for first-time readers of The Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. Christopher Morley wrote: "Devoted readers have rarely had such a shock as the opening words of this story when it first appeared in the Strand Magazine."

And so too did we. Some reflections on the drastic turn of events and of the reactions to readers around the world.


Download | 8.6 MB 18:56



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Links





Music credits

Performers: Uncredited violinist, US Marine Chamber Orchestra
Publisher Info.: Washington, DC: United States Marine Band.



Transcript


Narrator: [00:00:01] Welcome to Trifles - a weekly podcast about the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:06] "It is of course a trifle, but there is nothing so important as trifles."

Narrator: [00:00:11] Yes, the Problem was Final, the House was Empty and his Bow was Last, but there are so many other details to pick apart in the stories.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:19] Pray, be precise as to details.

Narrator: [00:00:22] You know the plots,but what about the minutiae? Why would the Pope engage Sherlock Holmes's services? Why did he receive the Legion of Honor from France? And why would he refuse a knighthood?

Denis Quilley: [00:00:33] You are very inquisitive Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:35] It's my business to know what other people don't know.

Narrator: [00:00:38] Scott Monty and Burt Wolder will have the answers to these questions and more in Trifles.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:45] The game's afoot.

Narrator: [00:00:48] Episode 16: The Surprise of a First Reading of the Final Problem.

Scott Monty: [00:00:55] Hi there and welcome to Trifles, the Sherlock Holmes podcast where we delve into some of the nitty gritty details of the Sherlock Holmes stories. I'm Scott Monty.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:07] I'm Burt Wolder.

Scott Monty: [00:01:09] And are you - are you ready for this? Have you recovered from the Easter episode yet?

Burt Wolder: [00:01:15] Oh there's just a few flakes of chocolate around my lips and we're just clearing up the eggshells. But other than that, it's all fine.

Scott Monty: [00:01:24] Well you'll have to speak louder because I still have jelly beans in my ears. I don't know how they got there but we are we are through with -- which is interesting. We talked about the resurrection of Holmes - the Return - and the Empty House in particular. And now we're going back to look at the final problem seems a little out of order. We let the calendar dictate what we do and allow us to dictate what you do. Before we get into this, please leave us a rating or a review on the platform of your choice wherever you happen to listen to us. It would be very helpful if you told other people what you think of the show. Share this update with them of course show notes are available at ihose.co/trifles16. Feel free to leave us a comment there and we do appreciate the comments that have been flowing in. And as always, your support with Patreon or even PayPal would be very helpful just to help keep the show going. Over on SherlockHolmesPodcast.com.

Scott Monty: [00:02:32] So let's talk a little bit about "The Final Problem." Do you remember the first time you read "The Final Problem," Burt?

Burt Wolder: [00:02:41] It's vaguely -- you know I first encountered the Sherlock Holmes stories in the fifth grade through a volume from my school library and I remember that it was a big heavy book. I remember the illustrations in the book and I remember that the book ended with The Final Problem. And I remember that it included that Paget illustration of Holmes and Moriarty entwined, hurtling over the falls. Yeah, I remember a keen disappointment for having just discovered this magnificent hero to - it seemed very rapidly to me - come to his demise.

Scott Monty: [00:03:25] Had you had you read through all of the Adventures and all of the Memoirs at this point in kind of the book form?

Burt Wolder: [00:03:34] Yes. Yeah. The book that I'd gotten from the school library included the Memoirs and I'm pretty sure included all-- I know The Final Problem was the last story -- so I'm pretty sure it included all the Adventures and Memoirs.

Scott Monty: [00:03:49] Usually you know when you come across them in a classroom setting, you'll read one or two stories out of order. The Red Headed League and the Speckled Band are usually the two most common stories that are used to introduce children around that time frame fifth sixth seventh grade.

Burt Wolder: [00:04:06] It could be too that my library had two separate volumes and they just got the first one I like it because they go on but I remember being one. One big book.

Scott Monty: [00:04:14] Yeah. Well I remember and I still have a version of it having a copy of The Illustrated Sherlock Holmes, which was a reproduction of the pages of The Strand Magazine as they originally appeared with those Paget illustrations. And of course The Final Problem was published in The Strand Magazine in December 1893. And of course Sherlock Holmes and the Strand started their association in June of 1891. So this would have been over two years of uninterrupted Sherlock Holmes stories, and just about every month in The Strand Magazine. And all of a sudden we come upon this story -- which by the way is also one of these chronological amazing opportunities, or chronological instances where all of the chronologists agree: April 24th 1891 is the date of this story. And when when you're first reading it, the opening sentence may make grip you, but then you get into the adventure. Ah, that couldn't be. And it's not until you get to the end of the story that the full impact of it really begins to weigh upon you and the opening sentence or the opening phrase is: "it is with a heavy heart that I take up my pen to write these, the last words and which I shall ever record the singular gifts by which my friend Mr. Sherlock Holmes was distinguished." It's -- you know, Conan Doyle just had a way of gripping you of hooking you. And in our friend Christopher Morley remarked on this in his famous book Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson: A Textbook of Friendship. You want to read his excerpt? Because you do a great Morley.

Burt Wolder: [00:06:24] Well it's easy to do a representation of someone who sadly passed away in 1957. There are a lot too many extant copies of his recorded voice bubbling around. But he writes in the textbook: "Devoted readers have rarely had such a shock as the opening words of this story when it first appeared in The Strand Magazine. The Adventures of Holmes and Watson had been running since July 1891 with only a few months vacation in the Summer of '92 for the author to think up new plots. Few characters of fiction have so immediately won readers' hearts and the sudden news of Holmes death caused consternation. A study of the files of the Strand shows the editor's attempts to console his readers by various substitutes and imitations. Doyle himself was bored with Holmes and did not relent until 1901 when the Hound began seriously serially in the same magazine.

Scott Monty: [00:07:31] There it is and then of course Watson concludes the story saying he "endeavored to clear his memory by attacks upon him whom I shall ever regard as the best and wisest man whom I have ever known.

Burt Wolder: [00:07:53] Yes.

Scott Monty: [00:07:54] Talk about finality.

Burt Wolder: [00:07:58] And as we find out nine years later, not really so. But one of the things you know we should point out that really adds to the verisimilitude - the reality - of this particular story is a technique that we observed back in our discussion of the Speckled Band. In Watson's opening you remember the Speckled Band Watson's openings he says, "well you know the lady in question sadly passed on and there's been some recent commentary about the supposed -- the circumstances of the death of Grimesby Roylott, so I really must set the record straight..." Well here, Watson says "my hand has been forced, however by the recent letters in which Colonel James Moriarty defends the memory of his brother and I have no choice - no choice but to lay the facts before the public exactly as they occurred. I alone know the absolute truth of the matter and I'm satisfied that the time has come when no good purpose is to be served by its suppression." So you've got you know again this lovely additional -- this is really the truth is it wasn't my idea that this fellow's been writing these things now. Well now I'm going to set the record straight.

Scott Monty: [00:09:07] Well and to hammer things home even further, Watson continues to say "as far as I know there have only been three accounts in the public press that in the Journal de Geneve upon May 6th 1891, the Reuters dispatch in the English papers on May 7th, and finally the recent letters to which I have alluded."

Burt Wolder: [00:09:38] Now we've glossed over the fact that one of the great canonical conundrums occurs in the passages we just looked at. Which is the fact that there appear to be two brothers Moriarty both named John.

Scott Monty: [00:09:51] And then there's a third one which we find later in the Valley of Fear, is there not? It was a station master.

Burt Wolder: [00:10:00] Is there? I don't remember the station but I see one.

Scott Monty: [00:10:05] Well we're assuming a station master and a colonel wouldn't be the same thing, right?

Burt Wolder: [00:10:13] Right. Is there that specific a reference to Moriarty in The Valley of Fear? I don't remember that.

Scott Monty: [00:10:18] Let me see.

[00:10:23] I remember, you know the closing: "You must give me time, Watson" about addressing the evil of Moriarty But that places the case before The Final Problem, obviously.

Scott Monty: [00:10:39] No, I'm drawing a blank on that one. Maybe I made that up out of whole cloth.

Burt Wolder: [00:10:50] I like it. Sounds good.

Scott Monty: [00:10:53] Oh here it is. This is "you told me once Holmes that you had never met Professor Moriarty." "No I never have." "How do you know about his rooms.

Burt Wolder: [00:11:05] I've been there on three separate occasions.

Scott Monty: [00:11:08] "You found something compromising?" "Absolutely nothing. That's what amazed me. However, you have now seen the point of the picture. It shows him to be a very wealthy man. How did he acquire wealth? He's unmarried. His younger brother is a station master in the West of England."

Burt Wolder: [00:11:29] Oh right. OK. So there are three of them. Well wait a minute now. One was Curly, right? And then Curley died. And then it was Curly Joe. No then there was Shemp.

Scott Monty: [00:11:40] Hey, that HUUUURRRTS!

Burt Wolder: [00:11:43] This is the Shemp of the Moriarty clan.

Scott Monty: [00:11:48] I love it.

Larry Fine: [00:11:50] Hey Moe, mine hernia.

Burt Wolder: [00:11:56] Well if you're going to talk about Hernia, we're back in Shakespeare.

Scott Monty: [00:12:02] But let's think back let's get back on track here. The shock that a reader has when coming across this final story in the Sherlock Holmes stories you know whether it's in the Strand magazine and you were a contemporary of Conan Doyle reading this, and and reading that final line which seemed like it had a great deal of finality to it. Or whether you're -- you've got this collected edition and you come to the final story in it and you close the cover and that's it. Unless you have the complete Sherlock Holmes in which case you know there's about two thirds more of the book. You have to finish. Even so - even knowing that there are more stories to come for the modern day reader, it's still a great shock and a wave of emotion -- at least from my experience -- passed over me. How could this happen? Our hero was at the height of his powers -- was at the height of his career and now he's gone.

Burt Wolder: [00:13:11] Well, you know there are a lot of -- I mean I don't want to trivialize it -- but there are a lot of contemporary echoes of that: it's the great shock and disappointment and unhappiness people had when Star Trek was canceled after its first two seasons all those years ago and look what happens. I mean, you become deeply entwined and you deeply enjoy the adventures of this character and then for no apparent reason, you come to a stop sign. And it's hurtful, yeah.

Scott Monty: [00:13:49] And for the folks that lived through it the folks that didn't have a Sherlock Holmes story for what, seven years, until the Hound came out. And even then Watson was very clear that it was a retrospective not a resurrection. And then another nine years beyond that before the return came about I think is that right. Or no, another two years before the Return came out, that's a lifetime and the Strand magazine. You know this was its lifeline. This was the fuel that helped the magazine maintain its subscription numbers. Now we are told -- and there's never been any concrete evidence to prove this -- but the the urban legend is that when Sherlock Holmes was perceived to have died at the Reichenbach Falls, that Victorian gentleman began to wear mourning. They wore the black crepe around their arms and in a show of sadness and mourning obviously, and of solidarity. That's how much Sherlock Holmes crept into the public's imagination.

Burt Wolder: [00:15:08] But we've never found any any confirming support for that. That may be an urban legend. And I notice that in Morley's writings he says well, you know from the standpoint of the letters of the editors of the Strand, it was clear they were trying to respond to their readers and suggest imitations and other things, so there's clearly some sounds like there's some support for that. But for the crepe armbands, perhaps not.

Scott Monty: [00:15:36] Yeah.

Burt Wolder: [00:15:38] You know one thing that's never been remarked in all of the-- or maybe it has been, maybe I just don't remember it -- in the scholarship around the departure of Sherlock Holmes over the Reichenbach Falls is the the roots of that. You know, Conan Doyle, among many other things in his enthusiasms, popularized skiing as a sport and an activity and an exercise. And as we know Conan Doyle was also in later years more and more involved in psychical research and spiritualism. The society for Psychical Research that he was a part of included among its members Arthur Balfour and Balfour became prime minister. He was a conservative politician; he became prime minister of the UK in 1902. And there are a lot of parallels between Balfour's character - in particular his apparently, his desire not to physically exert himself that are reminiscent of Mycroft. But Balfa also had a younger brother -- Francis Maitland Balfour I think -- who died trying to scale Montblanc in Switzerland in the early 1880s. And so there's some thinking that says you know as Conan Doyle was in Switzerland and saw the Reichenbach and had the past experience of Balfour's brother dying sadly in that sort of mountain setting, he thought to himself what a great place to entomb this character.

Scott Monty: [00:17:20] And it also explains why Conan Doyle preferred Parker Pens over Montblanc.

Burt Wolder: [00:17:29] Yes - too deadly. Too dangerous.

Scott Monty: [00:17:33] You'll put your eye out!

Burt Wolder: [00:17:35] One slip and I'm gone. "Dear Lord Molesworth, Your No. 7 Broad is precisely what I've needed all my life. Arthur Conan Doyle."

Scott Monty: [00:17:48] I think that will wrap that one up nicely.

Clive Merrison: [00:17:51] It is of course a trifle, but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:17:56] Please join us again next week for another installment of Trifles. Show notes are available on SherlockHolmesPodcast.com. Subscribe to us on iTunes and be sure to check out our longer show I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere where we interview notable Sherlockians, share news, and go into even more depth on certain topics.

Peter Barksworth: [00:18:21] You take my breath away, Mr. Holmes.

David Burke: [00:18:25] It's with a heavy heart that I take up my pen to write these, the last words in which I shall ever record the singular gifts by which my friend Mr. Sherlock Holmes was distinguished. I shall ever regard him as the best and the wisest man I've ever known.

--

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

"tell me how you came alive" [EMPT] 


While there is no explicit mention of Easter in the Sherlock Holmes story, we do have a story arc that follows the Easter mystery.

While Holmes himself may not have been terribly religious (although he did express some acknowledgement of a higher power from time to time), he respected the tradition and the necessary belief in resurrection.



Download | 8.8 MB 19:12



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Links



Music credits

Performers: Uncredited violinist, US Marine Chamber Orchestra
Publisher Info.: Washington, DC: United States Marine Band.
Copyright: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0


--


Wednesday, April 5, 2017

"roused its snakish temper" [SPEC] 



"The Adventure of the Speckled Band" is consistently ranked as one of the most popular Sherlock Holmes stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. And in it, there are so many gems, so many possibilities to explore.

We manage to delve into a few of them, including Dr. Roylott's clever yet poorly executed plan, the seemingly disparate time it took for victims to die, a passing glance at scores of untold cases accumulated during those early years, and more.



Download | 10.3 MB 22:30



Please leave us a rating and review on iTunes or Google Play, and consider supporting our efforts through Patreon or PayPal.


Links

Music credits

Performers: Uncredited violinist, US Marine Chamber Orchestra
Publisher Info.: Washington, DC: United States Marine Band.
Copyright: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0


Transcript

Narrator: [00:00:01] Welcome to Trifles - a weekly podcast about the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:05] It is of course a trifle, but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:00:11] Yes the Band was Speckled and there were Six Napoleons, but there are so many other details to pick apart in the stories.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:18] Pray, be precise as to details.

Narrator: [00:00:21] You know the plots, but what about the minutiae? Have you ever stopped to wonder about why Dr Watson was called James by his wife? Or of Sherlock Holmes's dining habits? Or what happened when he let a criminal escape?

Denis Quilley: [00:00:33] You are very inquisitive Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:35] This is my business to know what other people don't know.

Narrator: [00:00:38] Scott Monty and Burt Wolder will have the answers to these questions and more in Trifles.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:45] The game's afoot.

Narrator: [00:00:47] Episode 14. The Speckled Band and its Snakish temper.

Scott Monty: [00:00:56] Hello and welcome back to Trifles, the Sherlock Holmes podcast where we get into the details of the Sherlock Holmes stories. I'm Scott Monty.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:06] And I'm Burt Wolder.

Scott Monty: [00:01:07] How about that? Are you - are you ready for yet another week, another month ahead of us? We are at the top of April now.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:16] How did it get here?

Scott Monty: [00:01:18] Spring is springing up you know - just keep turning the pages of the calendar and we will move along with you. With any luck. Well, we are in for a treat! And before we get started, how about a reminder here? Folks, if you would like to help us out you can do a couple of things: 1) Go to the platform of your choice - whether it's Google Play or iTunes, and leave us a rating. Let people know what you think of the show. That helps us continue to get in front of more people and helps other people enjoy the show. So please leave us a rating and or a review.

Scott Monty: [00:01:57] And of course this is a Patreon-supported show. We already have a handful of people who have pledged a certain amount per episode. We appreciate that. But we could always use more. You know, the transcript costs, the e-mail costs, the file-hosting costs - it all adds up. So if you can do your part and just click on the Patreon button on our site SherlockHolmesPodcast.com, that would help us out. And thank you as always for your comments. We've seen them coming in on the Web site. And we do appreciate your feedback. We've been interacting with you there, so keep the comments coming.

Scott Monty: [00:02:36] Now let's get on with the show. We promised you at the top of the show The Speckled Band and it's snakish temper. And look, this is the first time we're getting to talk about the Speckled Band. This is a story that is so rich in details. It is so full of characters or one character in particular. As you know we have a mention of Mrs. Hudson, we have Holmes's deductions that come from splatters of mud on Miss Stoner's dress. We have an evil villain, we have a mysterious manor house so many elements to talk about and we will get to those and more over the course of this podcast. However, for this episode I want to talk about the Speckled Band and its snakish temper. So here we have Sherlock Holmes really at his best. He's kind and considerate to Miss Stoner as she's shivering and shaking in his sitting room and he's cool and poised in the presence of the villain Dr. Grimsby Roylott of Stoke Moran. And what danger he faces. He tells us of as he and Watson are you know holding their Stakeout. He tells us exactly what they're up against.

Jeremy Brett: [00:04:09] "A ventilator made, a cord hung, and a woman who lies in the bed, dies."

[00:04:13] Now if that doesn't set you up for suspense. I don't know what does. But - we know. We've talked to people, we've read articles over time, we've asked people "when's the first time you came across Sherlock Holmes?" and they say, "Oh, I read that story with the snake." You know, even if you can't remember the title of it, you remember the snake. So this is consistently one of the top rated stories in the entire canon. And it was first published in The Strand magazine in February 1892 and probably one of the most unique instances all of the chronologists agree that the case actually took place in early April 1883.

Burt Wolder: [00:05:02] And that of course the clue there is the second paragraph of the story which begins by Watson saying "It was early in April in the year 83." [LAUGHTER]

Scott Monty: [00:05:13] Well he's he's messed with us before you know. You know we've just mentioned in the last episode "The Adventure of Wisteria Lodge," and Watson says it opens in March of 1892. Can you, can you hear anything wrong with that date?

Burt Wolder: [00:05:35] Well perhaps yes.

Scott Monty: [00:05:36] It's smack in the middle of the great hiatus after Holmes supposedly went over the Reichenbach fall with Professor Moriarty.

Burt Wolder: [00:05:42] Hi, atus.

Scott Monty: [00:05:45] "What do you say when you meet an atus?" Well, as we said, there is so much to unpack in The Speckled Band and we're not going to get to all of it. But we do want to focus on just a few things of note this time around. So first: wonderful opening, April 1883 and Watson says "In glancing over my notes of the 70 odd cases in which I have during the last eight years studied the method of my friend Sherlock Holmes." Now the Speckled Band is the is only the eighth story in this series of The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. And within that span of eight years, we're already hearing of 70 unreported cases. And I would imagine it would take a an act of the chronology gods to go back and figure out exactly which of the unreported cases happened during this time. Isn't it remarkable that Conan Doyle this early on in the series is already kind of planting a seed in our minds that this is a character or a set of characters that goes well beyond the printed page that we've had opportunity to see.

Burt Wolder: [00:07:03] Well that was the defining characteristic of the reality of Sherlock Holmes - that he's created the voice of Watson who is presenting all of this as real events and real solutions to real cases. And you know with a stroke he has created a universe of possibilities for himself, which is a very clever thing to do as a writer.

Scott Monty: [00:07:28] Well and how much do you think that that setting - of referencing previous cases - placed Sherlock Holmes squarely in the "reality confusion market," versus other things like placing him on Baker Street or just having him seem like a contemporary. What do you think the impact was of of story elements like that?

Burt Wolder: [00:07:55] What do you mean when you say reality confusion.

Scott Monty: [00:07:58] Well the fact that...

Burt Wolder: [00:08:00] You mean that...

[00:08:02] People are going to really think that Sherlock Holmes is real. I mean they're still confused today...but at that time.

Burt Wolder: [00:08:10] As we know he is. I think I think Conan Doyle didn't pay any attention to it. And I think he was baffled by how successful his... You know he you know he's read so widely as a child. I mean we've learned this through other conversations with other people and their observations about Conan Doyle. But he had read Poe, been influenced by so many writers, by so many great adventures of the Knights of the round table. He knew how to tell a tale. And I don't think he gave it much thought and I think he was surprised in later years how successful it had become. And it was a continuing point of irritation to him. You know, at one point after he'd been knighted he was knighted - for his work really - in explaining to the public the rationale from the British point the perspective behind the Boer War. He famously received a letter or an invoice tradesmen at home and the bill or note was made out to serve Sherlock Holmes and he was absolutely furious. And sent a curt note down to the tradesman and the tradesmen came running up to the house, very embarrassed, and said, "You know, my friends told me that you'd been knighted and when you're knighted you adopted a new name." And of course he realized at once that they were, you know, playing a joke on the tradesman and he laughed it all off. But you know it's -- that's the constant experience with the Canon.

Scott Monty: [00:09:42] Yeah. Yeah. Well, enough about reality. Let's get onto murder.

Burt Wolder: [00:09:48] Well no. Now we should say just another couple of things about reality, because the beautiful part about Speckled Band and how it starts is Watson does this introduction and says basically he says to you you know he's precluded from telling you about these adventures but now the lady in question has died and there's have been some some curious mutterings about the death of Grimesby Roylott. I really feel the need to set the record straight. And so he then begins to tell you that he was woken up. You've got one of these wonderful sentences in the Canon - Watson looks at his clock on the mantel piece and realize this is only 7:15 in the morning and there's Holmes, fully dressed standing by his bedside and Holmes says, "I'm sorry to knock you up Watson, but it's the common lot this morning. Mrs. Hudson has been knocked up." [LAUGHTER] "She retorted upon me and I on you." And Watson says, "Well what is it, a fire?" And Holmes says, "No, no. It's a client - a young lady has arrived in a considerable state of excitement who insists upon seeing me." So BANG! You know you're right into this adventure.

Scott Monty: [00:10:51] Yeah. And none of us could stifle a Beavis and Butthead moment on hearing that Mrs Hudson had been knocked up. She's getting very busy.

Burt Wolder: [00:11:03] Well and then you know you're off to the adventure and you're in the sitting room. Mrs. Hudson's brought up a cup of coffee and the poor young lady is shivering, and Holmes says, "Draw up to the fire" and "Mrs. Hudson has had the good sense of providing a cup of coffee. I see you're shivering." And she says in one of these lines that's a lot like "Mr. Holmes, they were the footprints of a gigantic hound," - she says, "It's not cold which makes me shiver," said the woman in a low voice. "It is fear Mr. Holmes. It is terror."

Scott Monty: [00:11:38] Yeah. Just classic, classic opening. And that's of course when we find out a little bit about her background. And we kind of glossed over it already, but isn't it interesting that this was written or published in 1892, and Watson mentions the eight years that passed between publication and when the events happened. And yet we find out that our heroine here has passed on - you know, "the untimely death of the lady to whom the pledge was given." How sad - Holmes was able to save her allow her to go on to her marriage. And by the way there are SPOILER ALERTS in this show, folks, in case you haven't figured that out. But the fact that Holmes was able to save her so she could go on and marry, and then died less than eight years later. What a tragic life. You know her mother had been killed in a railway accident, her sister had been killed, her stepfather had been killed. You know. How sad for these people.

Scott Monty: [00:12:48] But speaking of stepfather And speaking of murder and killing I have to say if you are a doctor and choosing your method of trying to rid yourself of a family member it's pure genius to use a snake.

Jeremy Brett: [00:13:05] When a doctor is wrong he's the first of criminials. He has nerve. He has knowledge.

Scott Monty: [00:13:14] You know because when you think about it - certainly back in those days - even if the coroner had figured it out, had said, "Oh, I see these puncture marks and they match to what might be a snake." Well, Roylott could say, "Well of course, we have a snake that wanders the house," or "I have many Indian or exotic animals. It just it happened to bite my stepdaughter. It was an accident- an unfortunate accident." So he could have gotten out of it had he been caught. And I think that his ego got the best of him, because it worked so well that he wanted to repeat the process for daughter number two. And of course the Stoner sisters are twins. But why wouldn't he. Why did he do it so soon after the first daughter died? Wouldn't that have drawn more suspicion? And then why did he go and try to murder Helen right after she visited Sherlock Holmes, knowing that Holmes was on the case? Do you think he underestimated Holmes or was he just desperate?

Burt Wolder: [00:14:23] Oh I think he's a monomaniac and you know clearly you've got that magnificent scene in the sitting room later on when he confronts Holmes. He's a grand bully, strong, used to getting his way. A powerful personality perhaps a bit of a narcissist. And you know, doesn't think about the possibility of failure - just thinks about going on and on and on. And yet we know from the real life experience of some murderers, that chillingly, having succeeded ones succeeding again is more natural to them now.

Scott Monty: [00:15:07] I mean yeah, it's part ego, it's probably just part bullying and bluster, thinking that no one can stop them. And that scene you mentioned - the confrontation - which culminated in the bending of the steel poker above his head. But of course on our other show we have the great exchange between Grimesby Roylott and Sherlock Holmes:

Jeremy Kemp: [00:15:34] I have heard of you before. Holmes the meddler. Holmes the busybody/ Holmes the Scotland Yard jack-in-office.

Scott Monty: [00:15:45] And and Holmes is so cool. He simply glances at the door and he said there's a decided draft. Please don't let the door hit you on the way out, basically.

Scott Monty: [00:15:57] Well you know, it's just -- it's a wonderful old one. So many reasons that dramatization works so well. But also it's another indication that Conan Doyle understood the craft of writing, because the craft of writing - it's the same thing really when you look at scripts and television and movies: you want to show people things, not tell them things. And how do you show that Holmes is brave, confident, a force to be reckoned with? You know you confront him with a powerful evil and you show him reacting, and that calm cool reaction. It was just so beautifully done, and it's really part of the craft that Conan Doyle mastered so well.

Scott Monty: [00:16:41] Yeah it really was. So. So here we have the two deaths that we're treated to: one Helen told us about her sister Julia's death and retrospect, and then of course we witness the death of Dr. Grimsby Roylott firsthand. And in the first instance Julia wandered out into the hallway and she screams - she wandered in the hallway. She had the chance to tell Helen "It was the band - the speckled band!" Helen ran to get her stepfather - their stepfather. He came out - put his gown on, came out - and held Julia. And then she died in his arms. In the instance of Dr. Roylott, Holmes drove the snake back through the ventilator. It bit Roylott, we hear the scream, they race over to his room -- he's already dead! Now I have to imagine that Grimsby Roylott, who was a rather large man -- because "Our door had suddenly been dashed open and that a HUGE man framed himself in the aperture." That was his entrance to 221B Baker Street. I have to imagine that a man of that size it would take him longer to be affected by poisonous venom than his diminutive stepdaughter and yet he died almost instantly. What's the deal?

Burt Wolder: [00:18:14] Well, you know, commentators over the years have inferred or suggested lots of things around that time difference one of which was: Well first of all (a), it's impossible. You would not have died that quickly from a snake bite, but (b) that Watson is a doctor and he would have provided some medical help, even for such a great villain is this. And so one could suggest that Watson is glossing over his medical dereliction of duty. Of course the other explanation is that it just makes for better reading.

Scott Monty: [00:18:54] That's too simplistic. Now, do you think Watson may have helped them to his demise as part of that dereliction?

Burt Wolder: [00:19:03] Well I don't like to think that they sat around smoking their pipes watching him expire. But it could be, you know, that it was [CROSSTALK]... what?

Scott Monty: [00:19:14] He withheld brandy [LAUGHTER] -- the only medicine Watson knew that could have saved him -- he did not give him brandy.

Burt Wolder: [00:19:26] Well it could be that it took longer to get into the room than we have from the published account, but that's really that's really very funny. "Watson! I believe-- I believe the spark of life is left. Do you have your brandy?" "Yes I do, Holmes." [HICCUP.

Scott Monty: [00:19:38] "I've finished it."

Burt Wolder: [00:19:43] "Let's have some first." [LAUGHTER] "It's a chill night, as you know Holmes. Your flask." [LAUGHTER] Brandy.

Scott Monty: [00:19:55] I think absolutely -- as much as we're talking about Conan Doyle as the master storyteller, this is the kind of thing that adds to the drama, adds to the you know the excitement of the chase, and the climax and whatnot. It just -- it reads well. It would not have read as well and if they went in there and it took Grimesby Roylott 10 minutes to pass away. And you have one of these one of these melodramatic death scenes. You know, like Jon Lovitz as the master thespian: "You've KILLED Santa Claus!"

Burt Wolder: [00:20:36] Well you know, you have got two lovely things here: the wonderful conclusion. And it should be noted that around 1910 Conan Doyle took the story after the success of the Gillette play Sherlock Holmes and brought it to the stage in another attempt to succeed with his own work with "The Speckled Band." But also the second thing is in the story, this really does give you more echoes of a subject that we've talked about before, which is Holmes and faith and Holmes remarks to Watson, "Violence does in truth recoil upon the violence and the schemer falls into the pit," which I think Baring-Gould observed this goes back to Ecclesiastes. "He that the diggeth the pit shall fall into it and whoso breaketh a hedge a serpent shall bite him.

Scott Monty: [00:21:29] Perfect.

Jeremy Brett: [00:21:32] "Violence does in truth recoil upon the violent, and the schemer falls into the pit which he digs for another."

Scott Monty: [00:21:40] And of course Holmes said that "the death of Grimesby Roylott would not weigh heavily on [his] conscience." Well, all of these and more are mere trifles.

Clive Merrison: [00:21:55] That is of course a trifle, but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:22:00] Please join us again next week for another installment of Trifles. Show notes are available on SherlockHolmesPodcast.com. Please Subscribe to us on iTunes and be sure to check out our longer show I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere, where we interview notable Sherlockians, share news, and go into even more depth on certain topics.

Peter Barksworth: [00:22:22] "You take my breath away, Mr. Holmes."

Jeremy Brett: [00:22:27] "This is a nice household."




--

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

"quarter day is at hand" [WIST] 



There are at least two instances in the Sherlock Holmes stories when we come across a mention of quarter day. Just what is quarter day, and what is the significance with regard to these two stories?

We explore the origins and history of quarter days, cross-quarter days, and why the real estate market had such an impact on calendars and ultimately played into the plots of "Wisteria Lodge" and "The Resident Patient."



Download | 6.9 MB 15:05



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Links

Music credits

Performers: Uncredited violinist, US Marine Chamber Orchestra
Publisher Info.: Washington, DC: United States Marine Band.
Copyright: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0

Image credit: Wisteria Lodge


TRANSCRIPT

Narrator: [00:00:03] Welcome to Trifles, a weekly podcast about the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:08] It is of course a trifle, but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:00:14] Yes, the Box was Cardboard, the Detective was Dying and the Bridge was Thor. But there are so many other details to pick apart in the stories.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:23] Pray, be precise as to details.

Narrator: [00:00:26] You know the plots, but what about the minutiae? Have you ever stopped to wonder why James Phillimore disappeared looking for his umbrella? Or just how parsley can manage to sink into the butter?

Dennis Quilley: [00:00:38] You are very inquisitive Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:40] It is my business to know what other people don't know.

Narrator: [00:00:45] Scott Monty and Burt Wolder will have the answers to these questions and more in Trifles.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:53] The game is afoot.

Narrator: [00:00:57] Episode 13: Quarter Day is at Hand.

Scott Monty: [00:01:03] Well, welcome back to Trifles, the Sherlock Holmes podcast for fans that are interested in the details and the stories. I'm Scott Monty.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:13] And I'm Burt Wolder always interested.

Scott Monty: [00:01:16] Well, you're always interesting and see that's easy. The challenge is to try and do that week in week out show after show after show. How do you do it sir?

Burt Wolder: [00:01:26] I don't know. Actually you know I've discovered a little of me goes a long the way. [LAUGHTER] I could take me or leave me.

Scott Monty: [00:01:36] So you're like plastic man and we can see you're like silly putty.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:40] That's exactly right if you leave me sitting around long enough I just leech right into the couch. You'll never get me out of there.

Scott Monty: [00:01:49] Well here we are once again and we want to talk about quarter day since it seems to be a quarter day-ish over here. We are releasing this show on March 29th 2017. And when we when we try to look at the Sherlock Holmes stories, we try to look at what's going to inspire us on any given episode. And as you've heard if you've been following along here over the past few months, as we've been rolling out this show - and we are now in Episode 13 - that we've looked at things in the calendar that happened to inspire us. Things like the New Year or Valentine's Day or Ash Wednesday or St Patrick's Day. But then we also try to look at stories that occur during that particular time of the month during that during that month itself or a particular time within the month. And you've heard us speak about the Adventure of the Beryl Coronet for example and it was a snow-trodden February on Baker Street. And we also went through some of A Study in Scarlet references, knowing that Holmes and Watson had their meetings in in early January - or at least it was assumed that some things happened in early January. So here we come to March - late March - and there are two quotes from two stories that bring us to mind looking at quarter day.

Scott Monty: [00:03:28] In the Adventure of Wisteria Lodge, we of course had John Scott Eccles who was invited out to Wisteria lodge to stay with Mr. Garcia and when he got out there there was no one at home. And so he decided that he should go to the real estate office - the local real estate office - and he says "I called Allen Brothers, the chief land agents in the village and found that it was from this firm that the villa had been rented. It struck me that the whole proceeding could hardly be for the purpose of making a fool of me and that the main object must be to get out of the rent. It is late March. So quarter day is at hand. But this theory would not work." So here is our first reference to quarter day.

Burt Wolder: [00:04:29] Now quarter day goes back to the Middle Ages, I think. And it is sort of a marking point and a milestone in the calendar that comes at the end of a quarter. So the first quarter, January, February and March, ends in March. So the quarter day late typically called Lady Day in England is 25th of March. Then the next one around the same time in June - June 24th would be Midsummer Day, Michaelmass at the end of September, and of course Christmas at the end of December. And they tend to fall under religious festivals, they're roughly three months apart, close to the solstices in the equinoxes.

Burt Wolder: [00:05:10] And they used to be very important I think in the Middle Ages - they ensured that debts and unresolved lawsuits didn't linger on. You know there were milestones against which certain items like that needed to be resolved. And school terms. When I was when I was first in England I could never figure out - because I had a member having a pocket calendar that told me about the Michaelmas term and I had absolute that it meant absolutely nothing to me - but school terms are typically organized around that and other things.

Scott Monty: [00:05:46] That is true. That is true. Well, according to our good friends at Wikipedia- because that's the best we can do right now - [LAUGHTER] Lady Day, which which is March 25th - this would have been the quarter day that that Mr. Eccles was talking about. Lady Day was also the first day of the year in British Dominion's excluding Scotland until 1752 and that's when it was harmonised with the Scottish practice of January 1st being New Year's Day. So the British tax year still starts on Old Lady Day which is under the Gregorian calendar as April 6th, and it corresponded to March 25th under the Julian calendar. So that's that's where you get the the difference there. But and just for clarification it's not Old Lady Day. It's it's old Lady Day. And the dates of quarter days observed in northern England until the 18th century were actually the same as those in Scotland.

Scott Monty: [00:07:03] And then there are also things known as cross-quarter days which are four holidays that fall in-between quarter days. You've got Candlemas on February 2nd, May Day of course May 1st, Lammas on August 1st and All Hallows on November 1st.

Burt Wolder: [00:07:26] Now typically associated with Halloween.

Scott Monty: [00:07:29] Yes. Yes exactly. So there's there's a mnemonic for remembering which day of the month the first three quarter days fall. Since Christmas is obviously pretty easy to figure out every quarter day is 20-something. Okay? And the second digit of the day of the month is the same number of letters in the month name. and some march the word March has five letters in it.

Burt Wolder: [00:07:59] Huh?

Scott Monty: [00:07:59] So quarter day is March 25th.

Burt Wolder: [00:08:03] Oh, I see.

Scott Monty: [00:08:04] And June has four letters in it so quarter day and June is June 24th. And then September 9 so it's September 29th. So there you go.

Burt Wolder: [00:08:19] Well now you tell me. When did the calendars align? I mean the new year the new year began on January 1 rather than March 1. It wasn't in the 18th - it wasn't there earlier than the 18th century?

Scott Monty: [00:08:37] Well. I know the it says here Lady Day was the first day of the year in British dominions until 1752.

Burt Wolder: [00:08:48] Yeah, but weren't the calendars aligned...?

Scott Monty: [00:08:50] Well, the Gregorian calendar was was put into place in 1582. And that's when there were 11 days. There was a gap of 11 days that was made up for. Boy, that would have been a calendar-maker's nightmare that year. But that's that's interesting in terms of the harmonization of Scottish and British calendars. That's all I've got here from from Wikipedia is 1752 is when they were harmonized.

Scott Monty: [00:09:39] We'll see. So anyway.

[00:09:40] I guess I guess - you know just poking around - I guess it was late in the 19th century and early even in the 20th century, Russia apparently changed its calendar in February of 1918.

Scott Monty: [00:09:51] Wow, that late?

Burt Wolder: [00:09:57] Interesting.

Scott Monty: [00:09:58] Well as as we mentioned in the in the St. Patrick's Day episode - in Episode 11 - it wasn't until the late 1950s that tax day was was changed from March 15th to April 15th in the United States. So a lot of lot of modernization going on. But what was interesting here is when we go back to that quote of quarter day and Scott Eccles and he said, "it struck me that the whole proceeding could hardly be for the purpose of making a fool of me. And the main object must be to get out of the rent." And he just to make himself look knowledgeable, you know it's late March, "quarter day is at hand." That's the day that rent was due to the landowners. And we're given to find that for all of his respectability that he's familiar with the "moonlit flit," something that Conan Doyle and his his Edinburgh origins would have been very familiar with. The moonlit flit - you know what that is?

Burt Wolder: [00:11:08] I guess you decant the day before rent is due.

Scott Monty: [00:11:12] Exactly! Get out of town by moonlight. Just clear the house out and you know, avoid your rent.

Burt Wolder: [00:11:20] Well I guess in those days. Yeah I mean you were you were harder to find if you hit the road in the middle of the night.

Scott Monty: [00:11:25] Yeah. Yeah. So you know clearly Eccles did not want to be caught up in anything as unsavory as that during quarter day. And then of course we have another reference to a very specific quarter day in "The Resident Patient." Of course you have Dr. Percy Trevelyan, who was looking for a place to practice medicine. And along came Mr. Blessington with an offer to take up residence in Brook Street. And he - they worked out terms where Trevelyan was to give Blessington some percentage of the proceedings some percentage of money that he collected from patients. They negotiated on that and Trevelyan said "it ended in my moving into into the house the next Lady Day." So Lady Day would have been March 25th. You can - if you look at the potential for dating that story - it narrows things down considerably for the chronologist. But again, interesting that you know even a high end doctor would have had to have been beholden to landlords and payment of rent and such circumstances.

Scott Monty: [00:12:48] It's amazing isn't it how these constructs once defined so carefully and broadly and with such broad strokes. People's lives and actions that today you can rent for a year, you could rent for three years, different terms on a lease, this, that and the other, 36 months... But in those days, you know, we're good for the next quarter, and we're good for a series of quarters. So I've got this place until. Michaelmas.

Scott Monty: [00:13:20] And even with even with the royal family - I mean they're all if not outright landowners, they're hereditary landlords. I wonder how the collection of rent goes there, if that's still something that's practiced on a quarterly basis or if it's annual or what have you?

Burt Wolder: [00:13:43] Oh that's a good question. I mean I know that you know most of Westminster obviously is still - not all of Westminster - is still owned by the Duke of Westminster. But it's not unusual to have lease holds that that would last 50 years, 100 years - maybe it's different today. I mean I've never been close to it but I remember reading about those characteristics.

Scott Monty: [00:14:08] And you know this is again this is just one of those little phrases that if you're reading the story - even whether you're reading it in detail - you may gloss over it. And to just step back here and think about it for a little bit, and what the implications were, and what the practice was at the time. Just fascinating to think of these traditions and customs.

Clive Merrison: [00:14:30] Is of course a trifle but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:14:35] Please join us again next week for another installment of Trifles show notes are available on SherlockHolmesPodcast.com. Subscribe to us on iTunes and be sure to check out our longer show. I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere where we interview notable Sherlockians, share news, and go into even more depth on certain topics.

Peter Barkworth: [00:14:57] You take my breath away, Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:15:01] You know my method. It is founded on the observance of trifles.








Wednesday, March 22, 2017

"To Sherlock Holmes, she is always the woman" [SCAN] 



It is the first story in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, and it is also the first of what we might call the stories of legend: those Canonical tales that have inspired our imaginations far beyond the events that Watson wrote down.

We already have Holmes and Watson, legends enough for anyone, but just as "The Greek Interpreter" reveals brother Mycroft Holmes, and "The Final Problem" outlines the evil figure of Moriarty, "A Scandal in Bohemia" introduces a character so compelling that she pervades our image of Sherlock Holmes forever after. Irene Adler, of dubious and questionable memory — to us, she is always "the woman!"


Download | 7.6 MB 16:56



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Links

Music credits

Performers: Uncredited violinist, US Marine Chamber Orchestra
Publisher Info.: Washington, DC: United States Marine Band.
Copyright: Creative Commons Attribution 3.0




TRANSCRIPT

Narrator: [00:00:01] Welcome to Trifles - a weekly podcast about the Sherlock Holmes stories.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:05] It is of course a trifle but there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:00:10] Yes the Greek interpreter interpreted, the Norwood builder built, and the Reigate Squire puzzled. But there are so many other details to pick apart in the stories.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:19] Pray, be precise as to details.

Narrator: [00:00:22] You know the plots but what about the minutiae? How many disguises did Sherlock Holmes use? What were the street Arabs? And how did he get information from his underground network?

Denis Quilley: [00:00:33] You are very inquisitive Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:00:35] It's my business to know what other people don't know.

Narrator: [00:00:38] Scott Monty and Bert Wolder will have the answers to these questions and more in Trifler.

Clive Merrison: [00:00:45] The game's afoot.

Narrator: [00:00:48] Episode 12 Irene Adler: A Legend Is Born.

Scott Monty: [00:00:55] Welcome back to Trifles - that Sherlock Holmes podcast that helps you delve into some of the details deep within the Sherlock Holmes stories. I'm Scott Monty.

Burt Wolder: [00:01:07] And I'm Burt Wolder.

Scott Monty: [00:01:09] And boy the water, she is deep. She is cold. She is Irene Adler. And this case -- boy if there isn't another character that springs out as prominently as Irene Adler -- and there really are just a handful in the Sherlock Holmes stories - the repeat characters the famous characters that get written about again and again and incorporated into every movie and television show and pastiche. The handful usually includes Professor Moriarty, Mycroft Holmes, Mrs. Hudson, and Inspector Lestrade. Now with Mrs. Hudson and Inspector Lestrade, they appeared multiple times in the canon. Mycroft, while he is Sherlock Holmes is only brother as mentioned in the canon, he appears in two stories but only two stories. And the same with Professor Moriarty. Technically he only appears on stage in one story but he is behind the doings of another story. He appears in The Final Problem and his hand is felt in The Valley of Fear. But it's Irene Adler who only appears in that single story. But because of that famous opening of being the woman - as considered by Sherlock Holmes - our imaginations have been inspired far beyond those events that Watson actually wrote down. So, thinking about this woman who pervades Sherlock Holmes's mind everafter -- or certainly our minds as she is always the woman -- we wanted to take our cue from a series of publications that Rosemary Michaud put out years ago called "The View Halloa," and she says a legend is born.

Scott Monty: [00:03:12] "There's no doubt that Irene Adler fascinates us. But was she after all such a very big deal to Sherlock Holmes. Shouldn't we read just a bit skeptical of a woman who apparently enjoyed the company of a bounder like the King of Bohemia. Was Irene anything more to Sherlock Holmes than a valuable lesson in the perils of underestimating an opponent? A living breathing Norbury whose picture he kept in a handy place for those times when he felt that his swelling ego needed an ice pack.

Scott Monty: [00:03:46] I think that's a that's a fascinating way to look at what for many of us or for many individuals has seemed like an infatuation. Why how do you think this all plays out.

Burt Wolder: [00:04:01] Well I'm struck by the fact that when Conan Doyle came to -- as we know A Study in Scarlet appeared in print in 1887, and 1890 the second novel appeared: The Sign of Four -- and it was at this point that the cases of Sherlock Holmes began to grab popular culture because: Conan Doyle began placing the cases of Sherlock Holmes in The Strand Magazine in that first series of stories, which we then came to know as The Adventures (because that was how the compilation book was entitled). And each one of the stories with the exception of the first one has a title with the word "adventure" in there. And the very first story that very first case that Conan Doyle provided to the Strand magazine was "A Scandal in Bohemia." And here's a case where he chooses to present Sherlock Holmes. Against the backdrop of this remarkable and fascinating and interesting woman by far the most--well, certainly among the most fascinating and interesting and captivating and capable women in the canon, if not THE most fascinating interesting and capable people in canon.

Burt Wolder: [00:05:18] First of all she says she is an artist of considerable skill. World wide world renowned Soprano. She was born in New Jersey homes as an entry about her in his in his elaborate dossiers.

Scott Monty: [00:05:34] A foreigner. Again!

Burt Wolder: [00:05:36] Yes she is a well-known adventurous. We hear that word adventuress introduced for the first time. Has the long alliance with the King of Bohemia as we know; frequently--comfortably adopts men's clothing because, so like Holmes is comfortable in disguise and uses disguise to participate in parts of society that she could not otherwise do easily. And in the end of course, leaves us by being a jump ahead of the great Sherlock Holmes. So for the first presentation of this remarkable character in what will become a long continuing series stretching from the 1890s to the 1920s, we see him against the backdrop of someone who presents as being smarter more capable and an equally mysterious.

Scott Monty: [00:06:31] But do you think she wears men's dressing gowns?

Burt Wolder: [00:06:36] [LAUGHTER] Only when she was smoking cigars.

Burt Wolder: [00:06:41] Folks, refer back to Episode 10 for the inside joke on that one. No I think that's a really astute observation there because you know right off the bat we are -- she is she's not just presented as as well as a one-dimensional character. I mean when you really stop to think about it, there is a lot of depth or character. But again when when when presented against that backdrop I think it it it makes it even more fascinating and makes it more wondrous. Because yeah, we had our experience with Sherlock Holmes figuring out this transcontinental set of murders in A Study in Scarlet with chasing after lost treasure, and The Sign of Four. But this is really his first embarkation on the short story world on these formulaic short stories in The Strand Magazine written by Watson which will appear again and again. This is - for the larger public - their first introduction to Sherlock Holmes. Fascinating that not only should it be against an unconventional opponent of a woman who is an opera singer who dallied with a king, but it's it's a case for defeat. And sure for the for the average person, there may be a soft spot in their heart for such an individual --and given that she was a beauty for the typical male of course-- we would suspect that he harbored some secret love for her. But this isn't any typical male. This is Sherlock Holmes. This is a man whose heart was was negligible when it came to ruling his emotions - his head ruled. And to think that he would keep her photo around or keep that sovereign on his watch chain as a souvenir. It's probably a pretty powerful reminder to him of what went wrong. By way of circumstance, I just happened to be reading Warren Buffett's annual letter to his shareholders.

Burt Wolder: [00:09:14] [LAUGHTER] Well isn't that funny. And I was just reading that about 10 minutes and I was astonished to find out that Mr. Buffett mentioned Irene Adler in there.

Scott Monty: [00:09:23] Not your typical weekend reading I can assure you.

Scott Monty: [00:09:27] Warren Buffett of course is the CEO of Berkshire Hathaway a large holding company.

Burt Wolder: [00:09:31] The Oracle of Omaha.

Scott Monty: [00:09:33] Exactly. This is a guy who drinks Coca-Cola for breakfast. He made a point in his letter about some past mistakes and specifically around the insurance industry. And of course we know that Holmes had experience with the insurance industry as well. One of the most winning women that he ever knew was was hanged for poisoning for children for their insurance money. But in this case in 1996 he says that Berkshire-Hathaway purchased Geico -- foolishly using Berkshire stock. A boatload of stock. Let's see... they.. sorry, that was to purchase General Reinsurance or so they acquired half of Geico they didn't already own. With cash then they used Berkshire stock -- a boatload of it -- to buy General reinsurance in late 98. The problem there is that like making a purchase earlier for Dexter Shoe, where they used stock for purchase, Dexter went out of business later that year and yet the stock ballooned to more than 12 times its original worth. OK. So when he made that purchase with General Reinsurance what it ended up happening is that it increased all of the outstanding shares of stock that they had. So by the time they had another opportunity and the insurance industry to make a purchase he'd made that cash again. Having learned from his mistakes and having kept those examples around of pain -- of paying only in stock and seeing the stock balloon later after a company went out of business -- and you know having having an increased the number of outstanding shares. So it's not unheard of for a very successful person to keep around memories of defeat, to keep themselves from falling into that same trap once more.

Burt Wolder: [00:11:53] That's a very interesting example. The the interesting thing about --- one of the ways to look at this of course is from the standpoint of Conan Doyle: Conan Doyle made no secret of the fact that he'd never really thought much of Sherlock Holmes. I mean, he did from the standpoint of being a writer, Conan Doyle-- Sherlock Holmes is kind of annoying. First of all, you have to think up a plot. And I think Conan Doyle was reasonably eloquent about the fact that he found the time devoted to thinking up the plots challenging. But second of all, Holmes -- we've talked about this before -- Holmes is sort of a center-stage character when he is onstage. He needs to do interesting and fascinating things -- and so that's a bit of a challenge to come up with those kinds of things -- so for the first case, Holmes is a given since the series is all going to be about Holmes and Watson. BUT... here we have Irene Adler! An exotic talented artist allied with the King of Bohemia, a talented singer, a woman of the world -- but also a wronged woman. You know she's been pursued, and in some detail-- her luggage has been upset, her belongings have been ransacked. You know we get all of the details about that. So here is this lone woman admittedly remarkable talented capable, but at the mercy of this large, unfeeling force that then retains Sherlock Holmes. And that's a theme -- the wronge woman alone against great odds that comes back again and again in the canon.

Burt Wolder: [00:13:27] But the second thing is that Holmes because he is Sherlock Holmes can figure out a way to get this remarkable woman to reveal to him the location of the thing that she cares most about, and it's the smoke rocket that causes her to reach without thinking for her most precious possession. So Holmes has insight into how this particular person would think and feel and react. And therefore, when you get to the end and you find out that she's on to him and a step ahead of him, it's even more galling -- and beautifully fascinating for the reader. And I think that's why we're we're captivated by Irene -- by being presented with someone who is an equal of this man and why over the years people have thought again and again and again about what their possible combination might have led to.

Scott Monty: [00:14:20] Yeah and when you think about the the lengths that Holmes went to to get his prize -- first of all intuitively understanding what a woman would reach for in a time of danger. And he said to Watson a mother would would go for a baby, a married woman maybe for jewelry -- but he knew that this was something of value. So he was able to put himself in the in the mindset of Irene Adler.

Burt Wolder: [00:14:53] Yeah exactly and I think it's the only time Holmes speaks admiringly about the beauty of the woman. It's not the only incident -- certainly one of the few -- she really is that dainty is sitting under a bonnet for the 1890s This is equivalent to.

Scott Monty: [00:15:09] Va-va-va-VOOM!

Burt Wolder: [00:15:11] Va-va-va-VOOM, Watson!

Scott Monty: [00:15:15] And so you've got that ability to empathize to think like you're your intended prey. And at the same time you've got Holmes various disguises: he disguised himself as a nonconformist clergyman (again reference back to Ash Wednesday) and he also disguised himself as an ill-kempt drunken groomsman. So it has all the hallmarks of what we have come to know Sherlock Holmes as, not to mention getting Watson to help him come along and you know make mischief right. And yet --and yet -- he was defeated in all of that. And as clever as he was, there was someone -- and not just anyone -- but this fascinating woman who was cleverer than he.

Clive Merrison: [00:16:10] It is of course a trifle. But there is nothing so important as trifles.

Narrator: [00:16:16] Please join us again next week for another installment of Trifles. Show notes are available on Sherlock Holmes podcast dot com. Subscribe to us on iTunes and be sure to check out our longer show I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere, where we interview notable Sherlockian and share news and go into even more depth on certain topics.

Peter Barksworth: [00:16:38] You take my breath away, Mr. Holmes.

Jeremy Brett: [00:16:42] That is why I've chosen my own profession - or rather created it. For I am the only one in the world.

David Burke: [00:16:49] The only unofficial detective?

Jeremy Brett: [00:16:52] The only unofficial consulting detective.




Our Team

Scott Monty and Burt Wolder are both members of the Baker Street Irregulars, the literary society dedicated to Sherlock Holmes. They have co-hosted the popular show I Hear of Everywhere since June 2007.

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